Mountain High Opens Teen Resource Center Serving Homeless Students | News, Sports, Jobs

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Mountain High School student Kamren Holmes, left, gestures Friday, Sept. 16, 2022, during a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Mountain High School Teen Resource Center in Kaysville. Jennifer Christensen, coordinator of the teen center, is pictured on the right.

Deborah Wilber, Standard Examiner

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A room at the Mountain High School Teen Resource Center is pictured Friday, Sept. 16, 2022. The alternative school held a ribbon-cutting ceremony to celebrate the opening of the facility, one of many currently open, under construction, or planned in the Davis School District.

Deborah Wilber, Standard Examiner

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A pantry is pictured Friday, Sept. 16, 2022, during a groundbreaking ceremony for Mountain High School’s new teen resource center.

Deborah Wilber, Standard Examiner

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An inspirational art project titled ‘I Matter’, created by students at Mountain High School, is pictured Friday, Sept. 16, 2022, during a groundbreaking ceremony for a new teen resource center at the school.

Deborah Wilber, Standard Examiner

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A room at the Mountain High School Teen Resource Center is pictured Friday, Sept. 16, 2022. The alternative school held a ribbon-cutting ceremony to celebrate the opening of the facility, one of many currently open, under construction, or planned in the Davis School District.

Deborah Wilber, Standard Examiner

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Davis School District School Board President John Robison speaks Friday, Sept. 16, 2022, during a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Mountain High School Teen Resource Center.

Deborah Wilber, Standard Examiner

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A room at the Mountain High School Teen Resource Center is pictured Friday, Sept. 16, 2022. The alternative school held a ribbon-cutting ceremony to celebrate the opening of the facility, one of many currently open, under construction, or planned in the Davis School District.

Deborah Wilber, Standard Examiner

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A room at the Mountain High School Teen Resource Center is pictured Friday, Sept. 16, 2022. The alternative school held a ribbon-cutting ceremony to celebrate the opening of the facility, one of many currently open, under construction, or planned in the Davis School District.

Deborah Wilber, Standard Examiner
















KAYSVILLE — There wasn’t a dry eye on the podium at a groundbreaking ceremony for Mountain High School’s new teen resource center on Friday. The alternative high school, with a student body of 201 at-risk teenagers, is more than an educational facility for a handful of children; it is the house.

This is because some MHS students are homeless. Director Greg Wuthrich said there is a great need at MHS and throughout Davis County for adolescent centers that provide basic resources for one of society’s most vulnerable populations.

The Mountain High Teen Center is the fourth built in the Davis School District to date, with others in operation at Clearfield High, Northridge High in Layton, and Renaissance Academy in Kaysville. Two additional centers are underway at Layton and Woods Cross High Schools, and funds are actively being raised for others in Bountiful, Syracuse and Viewmont.

The facility was completed with a $1 million gift from the Huntsman Foundation and the Larry H. Miller & Gail Miller Family Foundation, along with students from Davis High School, who together raised $32,000 for the project during a fundraiser during the holidays.

While the district’s teen centers aim to lend a helping hand to children who lack access to basic necessities such as a shower, clean clothes and food, they are open to everyone.

The Mountain High Teen Center was once an underutilized cafeteria area. Today it is a fully functional space with a shower area, laundry room, kitchen, office/lounge area and master suite, among other services.

Wuthrich thanked many organizations, councils and community members for making this vital resource possible.

“Schools aren’t just a district thing, they’re a community thing, and we’re grateful to have a generous community,” he said.

Davis School District Board of Education Chairman John Robison took to the podium Friday night, recalling a time in January 1968 when he didn’t know where he and his younger brother were going after their father died, as they weren’t were only 19 and 15 years old. years old at the time and had already lost their mother nine years earlier.

Holding back tears, he said he had a special place in his heart for young homeless people and said those who have never experienced it cannot fully appreciate the depth of their experiences.

“I hope that, like me, they will advocate, promote and support future facilities like this,” Robison said.

There should be teen centers in all schools around the world, said MHS senior Kamren Holmes.

Holmes and his best friend, fellow senior Zephyr Finlay, who performed “Clair de Lune” and “Gymnopédie” on the piano for the ceremony, said MHS was not only the best school they had attended, but also the best they have ever seen. .

Teen center coordinator Jennifer Christensen said she is extremely grateful to everyone who has come together to help children in the community grow into the best people they can be.



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